Sep 16, 2014

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There Is A Solution

Most people think that 12-step programs are for quitting bad habits. This is because they have not gone through one of these programs, or if they have, they barely scratched the surface. In all of the hundreds of 12-step programs they start with addressing the problem. This is the first step in recovery. Admitted we were powerless over ______, and that our lives were unmanageable.

Beyond that we find that the issue is never brought up again in the rest of the steps. It becomes about reaching out for help from a Higher Power and other people who can help us with changing the way we perceive the world around us, and ourselves. We do a personal inventory of ourselves, looking at both our strengths and weaknesses, so that we have a better understanding of who we are and what we want in our lives.

We clean up the wreckage we have left behind us. By doing so we can move forward in our lives and become the person we wish to be, instead of the one we disliked so much that all we wanted to do was to get away from or kill.

We start to see a different future for ourselves, and as time progresses we start to implement a strategy to follow the dreams we once had. We start following those dreams and almost as if by magic we become the person we always wanted to be. Then we carry the message of hope to others so that they can change their lives for the better as well.

There is a reason the twelve steps are repeated in hundreds or even thousands of different programs around the world. It is because they have been proven to work for millions of people who have changed their lives for the better.

As we look closer into these programs we find that the objective is to discover what we are afraid of. What is holding us back from attaining our dreams. Then facing those fears and tackling our problems, then making our dreams a reality. We learn that there is nothing standing between us and our future, except the limitations we ourselves created.

If you are not living the life you want, then reach out for help. If you have an issue, whether it is your weight, a drinking or drug problem, smoking, or you just don't feel comfortable in your own skin, there is a 12-step program for you. All you have to do is admit there is a problem and seek help. Someone will be waiting to help you on your journey.

C Christian Andersen
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Sep 14, 2014

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Far, Far Away

You may have noticed last month I missed my post mid-month. I was busy trying to get the last bit of planning done to go to a friends' wedding in France. This included leaving my almost 2 year old with my parents at our house for 10 days. It was something I was unsure I was going to be able to do and was worried about what my son would think of what was happening.

And then the time came and we were in France and he was..... miserable. He had begun to run a temperature before we left and by the time we landed in France it was to 102ºF. I tried Skyping with him but it only seemed to make it worse. After the fourth time my mom sent me an email asking to take a break. I wanted to figure out how to head home. All I wanted was to hold my baby and apologize profusely for even considering what we had done.

After the break in Skyping he seemed to have done better and my parents were able to get a routine down with him and even teach him a few new things. It was probably harder on me at that point as I had no way of knowing that he was truly doing better besides the messages my mom would send me along with a picture. I tried to enjoy myself and thankfully France is easy to loose yourself in all the wonders around you, but the train to and from were hard as it was about an hour to any location and then back again.

It did not help, either, the other families with children his age. Most were probably from areas more nearby than the US, but it was still a reminder that having him along could have been done.

When we got back I was so excited to be home, I had to keep from jumping out of the car while it was still moving when we pulled up. My mother opened the door and said, "Look who I found." and at first he didn't understand what she was saying and just smiled at her. I bent down and almost whispered, "Jackson, hey." and as he turned to me the disbelief, relief, and confusion on his face was overwhelming. He slowly but steadily ran to me and I picked him up. He laid his head on my shoulder and looked at my mom and patted me on my shoulder/back. Every so often he would push back and look at me and smile and then lay his head back on my shoulder. I didn't want to let him go and I decided that I wouldn't until he wanted down or to go to Daddy. He did finally want to be put down and when he did he want to Daddy and gave him a big hug as well.

I am glad for the trip, I am happy he was fine by the end, but I wish I would have held off a few years until he understood better. The trip was torture while fun and that is not how I wish I was going to remember France.

~Chelsea Haller: HallerWriter~
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When Art Reflects Pain

Some time ago a woman who I know on Facebook read a book with a scene that got her thinking. She wrote a blog about it, and that got me thinking. Those thoughts of hers led me to these thoughts of mine. I’m curious to see what they lead to your thoughts of yours. It has taken me a long time to compose this note about my thoughts, but what can I say—I’m a slow thinker at times. Her blog was about how a scene in a book or movie moves us based not just on general feelings, but on memories of our own past, and she asked for others to recall the saddest scane from out life that was reflected in a sad scene in a movie.

There have been a good many films which have touched and moved me and not always based on my own experiences but on human emotion, on elements of the heart. I am especially moved by scenes of parents losing, or having thought lost, regaining their children. This does not hearken back to my own life experiences—I have no children, never had any to lose, but I can still feel hurt for, and feel relief for, people—fictional or not—being reunited with the children they had lost or were thought lost. Who among us with hearts could not?

When a Rocky Balboa-like character strives to be something better than he was and achieves or comes close to reaching that, we can easily cheer him on. We’ve all been down, and we’ve all wanted to rise up. We relate.

Songs touch us whether we can directly relate to the subject matter or not because as people we have all experienced enough hurt and loss to be affected by the loss and pain of another…

Many films have moved me on a human level, feeling the hurt of a character based on common relatable experiences, but only a few have seriously touched me on a deeper more personal level.

Regarding Henry touched me on many levels. Having gone through a head injury and coma, and subsequent rehabilitation like the main character in that film, I was able to relate directly to much of what he went through; aside from his being a successful, financially endowed attorney that is.


Another was Click, with Adam Sandler and Henry Winkler.
My father had a heart attack while visiting me in the hospital, when I was in intensive care when I was 14. He lived, but died from that heart attack a few months later. For some time before that period I'd been a stupid teenager and had distanced myself from him, trying to rebel against his fatherly control, avoiding spending time with him. A few months after he died it struck me that he died because of me being in the hospital, and that I had been so cold to him in the six months or so before he died. I blamed myself for his death, and for not spending more time with him when I had the chance. It took me five years to get over the guilt and stop blaming myself, but I never got over the lost relationship and time I had denied him.

Fast forward to the movie with Adam Sandler--Click--where his remote control caused him to jump forward through time with no way to rewind it. Now years into his future he was watching his younger self while his elderly father tried to maintain a relationship with him, and unable to control his younger self he yelled at him to respond to the father, because he himself was distraught knowing that he would never see his father again. I too was yelling, in my mind of course, at him to respond to his father, because it brought back the pain I had of avoiding my own father when I had had the chance to spend more quality time with him. Every time I watched that film, that particular scene hit me hard each time with memories and feelings of my regret.

And there you have it, the saddest thing could think of that a movie reminded me of. I cannot watch the film without thinking of my father, and of my missed opportunities.

If only I could click Pause and rewind that movie and do it all over again, the right way. But alas I cannot.

~inSpireShine
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Sep 11, 2014

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Caveman revisited

A recent discovery in Gibraltar adds to the growing body of evidence which portrays our Neanderthal cousins as smart, thoughtful people capable of abstract thought and an appreciation for art. Though the graffito found in a cave overlooking the Mediterranean may not look like much - perhaps like a grid for a game of noughts and crosses – the 39,000 year old engraving suggests that these prehistoric people engaged in abstract artwork – something akin to a Stone Age Jackson Pollock. Since this is a very significant discovery, I thought it would provide a welcome footnote to my novel Ancestor (given the almost guaranteed nature of further discoveries, I’ll probably be tempted to release a 2nd edition – with updated info – at a later stage). For now, I’ve decided to revisit the current ‘rehabilitation’ of Neanderthal Man – if not in popular literature, then at least in scientific circles – as portrayed via a character from my book.   

Later, sitting on his porch with a well-deserved tumbler of brandy, Professor Brophy recalled his Neanderthal lecture with nostalgia. Simpler days. When everything still made sense. He slowly mouthed the words of the prepared text. After countless presentations, they were ingrained into his memory:

“Today we inhabit a world where Homo sapiens is unquestionably the most intelligent - if only by reasoning ability - creature on Earth. Even recent scientific evidence of a remarkably similar genetic makeup, fails to hide the obvious chasm between man and beast (at this point, Brophy would normally show a slide captioned ’Over 95% DNA Shared’, offering a graphic side-by-side comparison of humans and chimpanzees, juxtaposed with a photo of a chimp drinking its own urine ‘from source’).

“But this supremacy hasn’t always been undisputed. In a period that stretched from about 250,000 BC until 25,000 years ago - before their kind mysteriously vanished - a related group of humans lived in Europe and parts of western and central Asia (on the projector, he’d cue a map of Asia, Europe and northern Africa, with known Neanderthal ranges identified in red - an area curiously overlapping the Roman Empire outside Africa, as Brophy once observed).

“These were people specially adapted to the glacial conditions of the Northern Hemisphere at the time. They had squat, muscular frames that were efficient at conserving body heat; gigantic, broad noses with multiple sinus cavities that warmed the cold air they breathed and deep, wide rib cages that helped insulate vital organs against freezing temperatures (here, Brophy normally flashed stock images of snow and ice covered landscapes, with humanoid inhabitants conspicuous by their absence - no point in revealing the creature to audiences prematurely, Brophy figured).

“Although the little we know about them has been gleaned mostly from fossils, the mere mention of their name evokes a larger-than-life image in most people’s minds.

“The Neanderthals.

“At the beginning of the twentieth century, their bones were thought to represent a primitive and barbaric race. Although it wasn’t supported by any scientific data, the zeitgeist was encapsulated by the alternative naming proposal for the species, Homo stupidus. Marcellin Boule’s 1911 reconstruction of a Homo neanderthalensis skeleton, purposely but erroneously crafted with a stooped stance, further reflected his contemporaries’ belief in modern man’s superiority (new slides showed artists’ sketches from the time. They depicted Neanderthals as hairy, hunched brutes - more ape than man). Unchallenged, Boule’s flawed artwork became the enduring image of man’s ancient cousin and, in subsequent decades, as the term ‘Neanderthal’ gradually morphed into a slur, this false stereotype was ingrained into pop culture.

“The latter is best illustrated by the 1986 movie The Clan of the Cave Bear, based on the novel of the same name by Jean M. Auel, where blond and blue-eyed Daryl Hannah plays the role of an inventive Cro-Magnon - as our modern human ancestors in Europe are sometimes called - adopted by a Neanderthal tribe comprising darker-hued dimwits who are incapable of complex speech and reliant on sign language. Of course, this also revealed certain Western racial prejudices (at this point, the professor would normally show a short clip from the movie, involving badly made-up actors grunting and hand-signalling their way through cringe-worthy sub-titled dialogue).

“Recent DNA studies, however, established that many Neanderthals were pale skinned with fair hair and light coloured eyes, while modern Europeans didn’t develop similar pigmentation until several thousand years later. Which, based on appearances, would make Daryl Hannah the more likely Neanderthal (Brophy normally allowed for a few seconds of laughter here, unless the audience consisted of school children too young to remember the striking actress).

“But that’s only on a superficial level.

“More importantly, new finds and a re-examination of old fossils have revealed that Neanderthals walked as upright as you and me. In fact, studies show their lower legs, which were short relative to their upper legs, allowed for exceedingly efficient movement over mountainous terrain, whilst also providing a thermoregulatory advantage in cold climates.

“The discovery of a Neanderthal hyoid bone matching that of modern humans, as well as the FOXP2 gene in their DNA - associated with language - also suggest they were fully capable of sophisticated speech (the slide that followed - a photo of a finger-sized, horseshoe-shaped bone - normally held more fascination for Brophy than his audience).

“Most humbling of all, though, extensive measurements revealed an average brain size for Neanderthals significantly bigger than modern man’s. Although cranial volume isn’t always an exact indicator of intelligence, the difference is impressive enough to suggest Neanderthals might have been smarter - if only on an individual basis - than our ancestors.

“For a while, though, notwithstanding this increased respect, any bolder declarations were hindered by a lack of corroborating archaeological evidence. As sceptics loved to point out, ‘clever is as clever does’. But, gradually over the last decade, as discoveries of sophisticated bone and stone tools mounted, and as evidence of a complex cultural life - including intricate decorative art - unfolded, this cynicism faded (cue slides of stone and bone tools, artists’ representations of limbs and torsos covered in decorative red ochre and black manganese paint, as well pigment-stained, perforated mollusc shells and pierced animal teeth strung together as beaded necklaces and bracelets).

“It all came to a head in the spring of 2012, with the discovery of cave art in southern Spain that shocked the scientific community to its core. Dated at 42,000 years, roughly 10,000 years older than any previous known samples, the depiction of seals was attributed to Neanderthals, making them the world’s first cave paint artists (an accompanying slide showed six detailed cave drawings of the sea creature, oddly resembling the DNA double helix).

“Of course, it never rains, but pours. Just a few months later, another amazing revelation proved the final nail in the coffin of the Neanderthals’ undeserved brutish reputation. Using a revolutionary new dating technique, a multi-university study concluded that several prehistoric cave paintings in northern Spain, previously attributed to Cro-Magnons, were in all probability produced by Neanderthals (slides with more cave paintings followed, showing handprints stencilled in red ink, a hazy red disk, and random red spots).

“Almost overnight, the supposed bedrock of modern man’s superiority, namely symbolic thinking and artistic expression, was in serious doubt. Decades-old theories had to be revisited.

“Given all this astounding new evidence and the fact that, according to DNA analysis, Neanderthals were a distinct genetic group not assimilated into modern human populations, scientists are left with one burning question above all others. Why are we here today and they’re not?

“The replacement of an established species by the arrival of a new one was nothing strange. It’s a scenario that’s been played out on countless evolutionary stages around the world. What was curious about the replacement in Europe, though, was the biological makeup of the invader.

“Usually an established species is replaced when a change in climate makes the environment more suitable for newcomers. Mammals, for example, survived the lower temperatures - caused by an asteroid impact - that wiped out the dinosaurs. But Neanderthals and modern humans followed a very different script (a short, noisy clip from ‘Jurassic Park’ - showing the famous scene where a T-Rex chases a jeep - normally followed; intended to reclaim restless audience members and prepare them for what Brophy viewed as the exciting denouement).

“Our ancestors were adapted to the tropical environment of Africa. They had tall, slender bodies to maximise heat loss through radiation and sweat; dark skin to protect against the sun’s ultraviolet rays and broad, flat noses to absorb the humid tropical air. Physically, they were much weaker than the powerful Neanderthals (now, finally, Brophy revealed recent artists’ renderings of Neanderthals that incorporated the latest scientific evidence. He was especially fond of the Natural History Museum in London’s 3-D model showing a strange and alien face - unlike the conservative approach others followed).

“And yet this seemingly inferior human from the tropics defeated a stronger and smarter human that was specifically adapted to the cold.

“During the height of the last Ice Age.”

Raymond Steyn
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Sep 10, 2014

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Ariana's Cafe Prompt 11 - September 10, 2014

Find us on Twitter @ArianasCafe
I am @arianahbrowning

What is Ariana's Cafe?
Simply put: a place for the creative thinker.

How do I use the prompt?
However you like. Use it as inspiration for a discussion, use it to challenge yourself to blog on the prompt as a subject. Use it to help you with a scene that you're struggling with. Use it as inspiration for a piece of artwork.


Bottom line: use your creative mind to come up with something amazing from this prompt.

Are there any rules?

No captcha. If you want to have comment approval, leave a note near the comments area. Too many people have been losing comments, and if their comment disappears, they should know that it didn't go into never land.

No private blogs. If you share, make sure your blog is public. (You can always use my forum arianabrowning.proboards.com to blog publicly for a post, then share that link here.)

No Grammar Police. A lot of the people who join in are not professional writers. They enjoy writing to share their thoughts. Yes, we all appreciate someone who takes the time to spellcheck and grammar check, but not everyone knows proper grammar. We support with these blogs. Don't critique unless it's asked for.


Share whatever you come up with below in the comments. If it's a blog post, share the link (always write some sort of description on the link so people will know you are not just a spammer). If it's a short story you want to share, again, share the link to it. If it's just a thought you had from the prompt, or maybe a scene that it helped you with, share that too. You do not have to share more than you want to, but even if you gained something from this prompt, I would love to hear it so I know they are of value, and which ones are valued most.

You're welcome to tag me on any social network if you share there. :)

Here is the prompt for this week! See you next week.



Ariana

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Sep 7, 2014

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That Green Shirt I Wear



Some time ago I had noticed in my photo albums how often I’ve been photographed, in different times and places, wearing one particular green shirt.

I don’t go out too often anymore, and when I say go out I mean to music clubs. But when I did go out and the dress code was casual, I would reach for the clothing most comfortable and halfway decent looking. Apparently, from the number of times the green shirt appears in my photos in the clubs and other places I was photographed in, intermixed with other shirts, it’s usually the same green shirt I reached for most often. What can I say? I liked the shirt, and it was comfortable. It’s the most comfortable casual shirt I have, and why should I stray from what is most comfortable and familiar?

On one hand it is embarrassing. On the other hand, it is sort of funny, in a way. Did you ever see that episode of Seinfeld where Jerry is dating a woman who seems to be wearing the same shirt every time they go out? George suggested, “Maybe you just caught her at the start of a new laundry cycle?” After that, Jerry was determined to peek into her closet to see if she was really wearing the same shirt each time, or whether she had a whole closet full of the same color outfit.

No, I am not going to enclose a photo of my closet to show you I have more than one shirt!

I was not a dance club frequenter when I was younger, nor was I into the types of music that I love now. Oh, I did like dance music, but again, going to dance clubs was not my thing. Then I became friends with lovers of the music scene, and several DJs, and I had found myself wanting to answer invites to drive to South Beach, Miami to brave my way into the musical nightlife that would take me out of my usual element of familiarity. So on many a night I would make the 35 or so minute journey to South Beach, and party with friends of the music scene; out of my familiar element, my comfort zone, until I began to fit in, and the clubs became my green shirt.

Winter Music Conference, Shine Nightclub, Blue, Cafeteria, Nikki Beach, Nocturnal. God, I loved South Beach; I loved Miami. I loved hanging out in the clubs with great music and great people, and driving home with the sunrise. I loved the town, the feel, the atmosphere, and the change in my element into a new comfort zone. But I would not move to Miami. If I did that, as time went by, it would become just another place to me. There would be no change. And I like that change now. Yet, in many other ways in my life, I avoid change.

I grew up in New York, on Long Island. When I was nineteen, my mother wanted to move to Florida; to be with the rest of our family who had already made the move. I did not want to make such an extreme and drastic change in my life. My friends were in New York. My town was familiar; it was comfortable. New York was my green shirt. But finally, my mother, who I was very close with, especially after I lost my father when I was fifteen, convinced me to make the move to South Florida, and on my twentieth birthday, I left Long Island behind and took my green shirt with me. Oh, not the same green shirt as the one I’ve been discussing; no, just the concept. When I was twenty-five, my boss wanted to promote me to manager and have me move to Chattanooga, Tennessee, to run his operation there. I did not want to go, I tell you. I did not want to leave my familiar element in south Florida behind, and change my life to adapt from my comfort zone.

Well, my family and friends urged me to make the change, and finally I made the move to Chattanooga. My boss was a contractor providing photography work within and through a tourist facility, and I became the manager of that location. But my boss and I did not see eye to eye on one matter, the matter of him paying me a large sum of money that he owed me, and he fired me. The next day, however, the General Manager of the tourist facility “fired” my boss and asked me to take over the photography operation. I did, and ran that operation for the next two years, loving the by then familiar and comfortable Chattanooga and knowing that I did not want to leave it again. It was also in Chattanooga, BTW, where I found the Lord and became a new believer in Christ, having been inspired by the very Christian employees I had working for me, and meeting a missionary at the end of one particularly depressing and troubling evening prior to being fired by that very boss. And that, my friends, was the farthest departure from what was formerly familiar and comfortable I could ever have imagined. Apparently, the move to Chattanooga had been part of the Plan all along.

But after two years there were more changes, and I found myself back in Florida again, and I did not want to be back. Chattanooga had become my green shirt. But there were other things in store for me, new opportunities and wardrobe cabinets to be opened, and so it was here that I remained.

In the years since, I had a boss who had a favorite saying, one that I remember to this day. “Change is not always good or bad, but always inevitable.”

There were also others, who famously said:
“The important thing is this: to be able at any moment to sacrifice what we are for what we could become.”
–Charles DuBois

“Change is the law of life. And those who look only to the past or present are certain to miss the future.”
–John F. Kennedy



Too often I had stuck with the green shirt because it is so comfortable. How often in life do we avoid straying from our comfort zone because we fear change? How often do we pass up on new opportunities that making changes might have brought about? Then we realize that we’re unhappy and we ask ourselves, “Why?” The answer almost always is, because we never try. If only we would, and when we do, that’s when new opportunities and new lives open up to us. Sometimes all it takes is a new shirt, or the willingness to go shopping for one.

On the agenda for next weekend: A trip to the store to buy some new shirts. And maybe even, a return to South Beach. So, that was my lesson for the day that I wanted to share with you. And like many unexpected teachings in life, it all came about thanks to a certain green shirt.



Are you comfortable with change? Do you stick with the same usual things because you don’t like change, or are wary of straying from the unfamiliar? Have you avoided certain changes when it was easier to stick with what was most comfortable, or familiar? What are the green shirts you have in your life?


~inSpireShine
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Sep 3, 2014

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What I Did On My Summer Vacation


“Make your life spectacular. I know I did."
                                         – Robin Williams, from the movie “Jack”


When I was a kid, I was never a big fan of going back to school (I doubt most kids are). I always relished the freedom that my summer vacation gave to me to play all day, watch TV whenever I wanted, and not have a care in the world. I always dreaded getting back to the old grindstone of studying and doing homework. It sure cut into my valuable time of playing under my blanket forts and watching The Brady Bunch, I tell ya!

But there was one assignment that we were always given on the first day of school that I actually enjoyed. It was to write a composition about what we did on our summer vacations. Oh, how I wished ALL of our assignments were that easy! First off, I ALWAYS enjoyed ANY opportunity to write in school. But this particular annual assignment was always one of my favorites because for me, it was SO EASY to do! And the reason for that was simple. Because in my mind, no matter how simple my little daily routine and activities actually were, to me, they all seemed grand and exciting! I sure made those days of reading comic books and pretending I was Wonder Woman, and having bologna sandwiches for lunch and sloppy joes for dinner, sound as amazing as a cruise around the world (complete with a ten course gourmet meal every evening) might sound to some.  And that’s because to me….it was!

While having an extremely active and vivid imagination came in quite handy as a kid to leave me with amazing summer memories to look back on……it doesn’t work so well as an adult. When you dress up as Wonder Woman now and run around trying to tie people up with your golden lasso, you might get arrested, people might think you got lost on your way to Comic Con, or …depending on who you try and tie up….. you might make some new very VERY open minded friends!

(“Hey there….your invisible jet….or mine?”  *Wink wink*)


But regardless of whether it’s summertime or ANY TIME, each of us have the ability to make some fun and everlasting memories to look back upon every day.  It’s something we can….and should….do! And it doesn’t take much. If you just take time to look around yourself everyday as you go through your daily routine, I guarantee you can find even the simplest of things to make yourself smile…..if you only just take the time to notice them! Whether it’s passing by your neighbor’s flower garden on your way to work or eating your favorite candy bar as a treat after lunch (…..or even before lunch. Don’t worry….I wont tell!) or even just watching the sunset with someone you love. Sometimes it’s the smallest and simplest of pleasures in life, that cost nothing or close to nothing, that can mean the most.

Always remember to make the best with the time we have….. because its the only time we've got.


While I might not have been running around in my Wonder Woman costume this summer (I swear that wasn’t me….. I don’t care what you think you saw!) I definitely took the time to make some lasting  and fun memories of my summer. I hope all of you did, too. Here is my video of some of the most memorable moments of “What I did on my summer vacation.”

Until next time! Ta ta and toodles!


~Tracie Dee~






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Ariana's Cafe Prompt 10 - September 3, 2014

Find us on Twitter @ArianasCafe
I am @arianahbrowning

What is Ariana's Cafe?
Simply put: a place for the creative thinker.

How do I use the prompt?
However you like. Use it as inspiration for a discussion, use it to challenge yourself to blog on the prompt as a subject. Use it to help you with a scene that you're struggling with. Use it as inspiration for a piece of artwork.


Bottom line: use your creative mind to come up with something amazing from this prompt.

Are there any rules?

No captcha. If you want to have comment approval, leave a note near the comments area. Too many people have been losing comments, and if their comment disappears, they should know that it didn't go into never land.

No private blogs. If you share, make sure your blog is public. (You can always use my forum arianabrowning.proboards.com to blog publicly for a post, then share that link here.)

No Grammar Police. A lot of the people who join in are not professional writers. They enjoy writing to share their thoughts. Yes, we all appreciate someone who takes the time to spellcheck and grammar check, but not everyone knows proper grammar. We support with these blogs. Don't critique unless it's asked for.


Share whatever you come up with below in the comments. If it's a blog post, share the link (always write some sort of description on the link so people will know you are not just a spammer). If it's a short story you want to share, again, share the link to it. If it's just a thought you had from the prompt, or maybe a scene that it helped you with, share that too. You do not have to share more than you want to, but even if you gained something from this prompt, I would love to hear it so I know they are of value, and which ones are valued most.

You're welcome to tag me on any social network if you share there. :)

Here is the prompt for this week! See you next week.

Ariana

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Aug 31, 2014

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Those Masks we Wear



 
How do you face the world
When you're so indecisive for a face?
How do you convey determination
When you can't pick one to put in place?

So many people are held back
In their image they do bask
You assume to know their persona
But the truth is behind a mask

So which do you choose?
Which face do you want to show?
If you wear a facade
Will it be friend or foe?

Perhaps today you'll leave it off
And the real you they will know
Perhaps no longer hiding
Your heart will finally grow



~inSpireShine
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